I recently attended a briefing on sexual assault prevention through my military unit. Predictably, the attendant video depicted a caucasian male officer fraternizing with an ethnic female junior enlisted. No actual sex took place; the assualt consisted of the male groping the female behind a bar AFTER she had flirted with him. And also, apparently, several months after they had already consummated a consensual physical relationship. Never mind all of that; the female is emotionally devasted and the male’s career needs to be destroyed.
Questions of actual sexual mores aside, I ask the following of the producers of the aforementioned video: If one lacks the physical ability and courage to defend one’s self from sexual assault, the mental ability to avoid situations which might lead to sexual assault, or the ethical ability to refrain from the commission of sexual assault, then by what virtue is one in the profession of defending the United States of America?
This is not an attempt to “blame the (imaginary) victim” or excuse the (imaginary) attacker. I simply wonder why the Armed Forces so often continue to cater the lowest common denominator, rather than inspiring–and demanding–greatness.

As I am preparing to attend Missouri OCS class 47, I recently had the opportunity to question the local RTI about what I might expect. She told me to be prepared to deliver limmericks and perform skits for the Christmas party. Then, she looked offended when I made the statement that “That explains VOLUMES to me about the United States Army.”
Here are two limmericks I came up with off the top of my head:
—–
A member of my fine cadre
Ordered me a limmerick to say
While feeling quite grim
I stared straight at him
And said “Celtic folk-poetry’s gay.”

I can extemporize in quatraine
Without really racking my brain
And sonnets are nice
I’d do haiku twice
But from limmericks I’d rather refrain.
—–
She apparently preferred the second to the first.

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